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Tom Sheehy, writing in 1970 in the Mordialloc-Chelsea News, tells of some significant events in the growth of Mordialloc and Mentone. He mentions men who made their mark on our history: John O’Shanassy, Colonel Mair, Thomas Bent and Percy Dobson. There are other business men and Mrs Patrick with her drapery store. Some of the events Sheehy mentions are the first land sales at Long Beach, the building of the Mordialloc Coffee Palace, and the first attempt to control the waters of the Carrum Swamp.
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Reports claims and counter claims about the Mordialloc City Council's proposal to build a marina at the base of the Beach Road cliffs. The plan was to spend one million dollars. The plan involved the construction of a 15 foot wide seawall, filled to nine feet above the low water mark and varying in distance from 21 feet to 15 feet from the cliff face. Those opposing the plan pointed to the natural beauty of the site and argued that the proposal was for the benefit of a few. Stormy meetings took place at council but finally, after the passing of several years, the Beaumaris Motor Yacht Squadron agreed the revised proposal to develop a ‘safe harbor’ would not proceed.
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Aspendale Technical School
The Establishment of Aspendale Technical School is a story that recalls the efforts of several local communities to gain the option of a technical education for their children. Opened in 1959 the school suffered a serious blow when fire in 1971 destroyed science, social studies and art rooms, as well as general classrooms. The principal also lost his office. A significant development occurred seven years later when the school was declared a co-educational facility.
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Frank McGuire’s article, How Chelsea Grew Up: A Short History, was written in 1970 and published in the Mordialloc-Chelsea Newspaper. In it he presented a fascinating chronology of Chelsea’s history up to the 70s. Fifteen years later, at a time when the municipality still existed, the Chelsea Historical Society published his book, Chelsea a Beachside Community. Since that time, Chelsea has changed and developed. Some of the buildings Frank mentions no longer exist, but his words help us to understand why we are like we are today.
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Peter Ratcliff writes of the Dunlop estate in Beaumaris and the company’s plan in 1939 to build a garden city. By 1952 the Dunlop board decided to forgo their original plan, sub-divide the land and make it available for 76 housing sites. They also offered sixteen acres, at a reasonable price, to the Sandringham Council for the creation of parks.
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Mordialloc Creek
People know of the existence and location of the Mordialloc Bridge Hotel, but not all are familiar with the man who first built a two roomed pub on the site. William Coleman arrived in Melbourne in 1841 as a twenty one year old and initially resided in Collingwood where he became a councillor, married, and commenced his family. Moving to Mordialloc, he gained a beer licence in 1868 and built a more substantial hotel in 1870. He was also committed to investing in land throughout Melbourne and subsequently died a very rich man.
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The Stookes, with family history records going back to the time of Oliver Cromwell, came to Melbourne in the late 1840s and early 1850s seeking new opportunities.
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Neil Follett recalls information told to him by Yoland, his sister, about the Braeside State School. He joined the school aged six years in 1950, staying for one year before transferring to Mentone.
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The small rural school, originally called the Mordialloc Settlement School, was built in 1915 in response to local families demands that such a facility be provided for their children. They deemed it unsatisfactory that their children should have to wade through water to attend Mordialloc Primary School and sit in class with wet feet. Named Braeside State School in 1925, it was closed in 1976 due to lack of pupils.
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Leo Gamble completes his story of the Friends of the Mentone Station Gardens with ‘Winning More Friends’. There he takes the story up to 2018, noting the developments of the gardens, the actions to prevent the building of six storey apartments overlooking the railway line, the grand sausage sizzle of 2014, and the new concerns associated with the crossing removal at Balcombe Road, Mentone.

Aboriginal Flag

City of Kingston acknowledges the Kulin Nation as the custodians of the land on which the municipality is a part and pays respect to their Elders, past and present. Council is a member of the Inter Council Aboriginal Consultative Committee (ICACC).