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Tom Sheehy wrote the story of the Keys family in 1979. He tells of the careers of members of the Keys family, who were early pioneers in what became Keysborough. John Keys, a son of George, was an engineer for both Moorabbin and Dandenong Shires and became a member of the State Parliament. Some of the land owned by members of the Keys family became part of Braeside Park.
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This story, written by Barry Tilley, is about the Ball family whose members for a time were residents of Cheltenham and Mordialloc and active in community events. John and brother William were the first to leave Cornwall and to travel to Melbourne. “While working in Maldon John was fined 2/6 for leaving his horse and dray unattended while refreshing the inner man at the Royal Hotel”.
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Pioneer Settlers was written by Tom Sheedy thirty nine years ago when he was the History Officer for the City of Moorabbin. It contains the names of 119 settlers who were petitioning for a local Post Office and some whose descendants still live in Kingston today.
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An Experimental Farm at Cheltenham was established as a result of the urging of local members of the Promotion of Rural Industries Committee as part of their ploy to encourage rural industries. The farm was created on four acres of Joseph Wedd’s eleven acres property on the corner of Centre Dandenong Road and Point Nepean Road (today Nepean Highway). There experiments were conducted into the use of various fertilizers, and the growing of particular plants. They tested a colourfully named set of potatoes including Carmen, Sutton’s Abundance, Black Prince and Windsor Castle Of the various fertilizers available, stable manure and super phosphate gave the best results but ploughed-in pea plants (green fertilizer) was also found to be beneficial.
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Leo Gamble recalls the sound of the hooter at Prince’s Laundry that announced the commencement and conclusion of the days work. Founded in 1905, the laundry provided work for local people, served the needs of local hospitals and guest houses which attracted visitors to the district. By 2005 it employed 400 staff and processed 25 million kilos of linen each year.
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Captain William Kenney was engaged in building the baths in Brighton Beach in 1872. The baths were in the news in 1855 when indecent conduct was reported to the police. Maintenance of this facility was an ongoing problem for which councils were reluctant to take responsibility. By the 1970s, the attendance at the baths had declined and they were finally demolished in 1979.
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The "Demise of Avenue of Honour at Cheltenham" concerns the lopping and lack of care of trees planted in recognition of many local young men who served in Australian military forces in World War One. The Cheltenham Progressive Association and the local Returned Soldiers’ Branch pressed the council to take action as they believed the condition of the trees reflected badly on the council and local residents. They requested eight specific improvements be made to the avenue of trees planted along Point Nepean Road.
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Joyce was a significant figure in this celebration which commenced in April 1959 and continued for over 40 years. She believed children should be encouraged to join a club where the idea of co-operation was instilled. “Dreams of youth”, she said, “should be made a reality and their energy harnessed for good outcomes.”
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Controversy Over Airport tells of the announcement by Prime Minister Ben Chifley that an airport would be established in our district. But the exact location was vague! The local community was stirred into action by the editor of the local newspaper. Market gardeners were alarmed that their land would be acquired by the Commonwealth Government. Yet the airport was opened without fanfare or disruption and went on to become one of the busiest airports in the southern hemisphere.
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This story traces the early history of the Cheltenham State Savings Bank and its incorporation into the Commonwealth Bank. There will be some Kingston residents who can remember the money boxes issued by the bank and taking ‘bank money’ to school on ‘Bank Day’ to have the amount recorded in their pink covered pass-book.

Aboriginal Flag

City of Kingston acknowledges the Kulin Nation as the custodians of the land on which the municipality is a part and pays respect to their Elders, past and present. Council is a member of the Inter Council Aboriginal Consultative Committee (ICACC).