Articles

Filter by

Thumbnail
The "Demise of Avenue of Honour at Cheltenham" concerns the lopping and lack of care of trees planted in recognition of many local young men who served in Australian military forces in World War One. The Cheltenham Progressive Association and the local Returned Soldiers’ Branch pressed the council to take action as they believed the condition of the trees reflected badly on the council and local residents. They requested eight specific improvements be made to the avenue of trees planted along Point Nepean Road.
Thumbnail
Joyce was a significant figure in this celebration which commenced in April 1959 and continued for over 40 years. She believed children should be encouraged to join a club where the idea of co-operation was instilled. “Dreams of youth”, she said, “should be made a reality and their energy harnessed for good outcomes.”
Thumbnail
Controversy Over Airport tells of the announcement by Prime Minister Ben Chifley that an airport would be established in our district. But the exact location was vague! The local community was stirred into action by the editor of the local newspaper. Market gardeners were alarmed that their land would be acquired by the Commonwealth Government. Yet the airport was opened without fanfare or disruption and went on to become one of the busiest airports in the southern hemisphere.
Thumbnail
This story traces the early history of the Cheltenham State Savings Bank and its incorporation into the Commonwealth Bank. There will be some Kingston residents who can remember the money boxes issued by the bank and taking ‘bank money’ to school on ‘Bank Day’ to have the amount recorded in their pink covered pass-book.
Thumbnail
Dick Garrard had an outstanding record as a wrestler representing Australia in three Olympic Games. Between 1926 and 1956, he competed in 526 bouts and only lost 9. Leo Gamble writes of Garrard visiting Mordialloc where he had family connections, and taking part in St Bede’s money raising events at Mentone City Hall.
Thumbnail
World War II
"Profile of an Older Australian" was a story told by Bruce Kyberd and recorded by Karen Barbarich. His was an interesting life. He came to Australia as a teenager under the Big Brothers Scheme and worked and drove sheep, rode horses, slept under the stars and survived on bore water. He struggled during the Great Depression travelling to Sydney, Melbourne and eventually Bendigo seeking work. During the Second World War he served in the Australian Navy then married, settled in Edithvale, and joined the Chelsea Council where he contributed as mayor of the city on two occasions. In summary he said he was content with his life.
Thumbnail
The story, "Edwin Thomas Penny: Councillor, Orchardist and Pioneer", traces his life from his birth at Marylebone, London, to his arrival in Cheltenham and subsequent burial in the Pioneer Cemetery. Penny was a man strongly engaged in his local community, his shire council, his church and a host of local organisations.
Thumbnail
Written by Veronica Hahn and John Macnaughtan, this article tells of A F Bradshaw, a man who involved himself in numerous aspects of the racing industry in the late 1880s.
Thumbnail
Leo Gamble writes of Jack Purtell, a Mentone boy, who was a very successful jockey in Victoria and overseas and who rode three Melbourne Cup winners. Jack served his apprenticeship at the Ted Temby stables and went on to win seven jockey premierships. Some of the horses he rode were Hiraji, Toryboy, Baghdad Note, Wodallo, Silver Knight and Rising Fast. He was one of the outstanding figures in Australian turf history.
Thumbnail
Chelsea Historical Society
Frank McGuire and Des Jowett give us some interesting historical snippets about the Mordialloc Frankston railway line. It was in July 1882 that the line from Mordialloc to Frankston was officially opened. Thomas Bent was there and announced to all the assembled crowd that two trains would be leaving Frankston for Melbourne from Monday to Friday at 7.17am and 3.55pm. He said there would be trains on Saturday, but no service on Sundays. How things have changed.

Aboriginal Flag

City of Kingston acknowledges the Kulin Nation as the custodians of the land on which the municipality is a part and pays respect to their Elders, past and present. Council is a member of the Inter Council Aboriginal Consultative Committee (ICACC).