Graham J Whitehead

Contributions

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Mordialloc Creek
People know of the existence and location of the Mordialloc Bridge Hotel, but not all are familiar with the man who first built a two roomed pub on the site. William Coleman arrived in Melbourne in 1841 as a twenty one year old and initially resided in Collingwood where he became a councillor, married, and commenced his family. Moving to Mordialloc, he gained a beer licence in 1868 and built a more substantial hotel in 1870. He was also committed to investing in land throughout Melbourne and subsequently died a very rich man.
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The Stookes, with family history records going back to the time of Oliver Cromwell, came to Melbourne in the late 1840s and early 1850s seeking new opportunities.
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The small rural school, originally called the Mordialloc Settlement School, was built in 1915 in response to local families demands that such a facility be provided for their children. They deemed it unsatisfactory that their children should have to wade through water to attend Mordialloc Primary School and sit in class with wet feet. Named Braeside State School in 1925, it was closed in 1976 due to lack of pupils.
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An example where local residents protested at actions being undertaken in their community. Deceased patients from the new Heatherton Sanatorium were being buried at the Cheltenham Pioneer Cemetery against a promise by the Board of Health that this would not occur. Residents were concerned about the possible spread of the disease, particularly with the school next door to the cemetery.
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Formed in 1900 by a keen group of local men, it became a club that fostered recruitments in the First World War. Morris tubes were used to modify normal government issued rifles, allowing the use of miniature ranges and cheaper cartridges in practice. They had shooting ranges set up in Cheltenham Park and Charman Road, Cheltenham at different times.
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This article concludes the story previously posted of Claude Nuttall, a Cheltenham boy. He joined the Australian Army as a twenty year old and served in France, where he was awarded the Military Medal and later wounded. Claude met an English girl while in hospital and married her in a small village church. He later returned to France, where he was killed. For some time he wrote a diary in which he described some of the actions on the Western Front. Read how this diary was returned to the family in Australia.
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Nathaniel Levi's dream was to drain the Carrum Swamp, plant sugar beet, manufacture gin, and employ 1500 individuals. Nathaniel Levi’s dream was not realised, but for a time local residents and people trying to earn a living on the swamp were enthusiastic about the proposal.
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A very long title which still did not cover all the events that took place at the show. Check out some of the people who attended, the winners, and where the show was held from 1897 to the 1920s.
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An Experimental Farm at Cheltenham was established as a result of the urging of local members of the Promotion of Rural Industries Committee as part of their ploy to encourage rural industries. The farm was created on four acres of Joseph Wedd’s eleven acres property on the corner of Centre Dandenong Road and Point Nepean Road (today Nepean Highway). There experiments were conducted into the use of various fertilizers, and the growing of particular plants. They tested a colourfully named set of potatoes including Carmen, Sutton’s Abundance, Black Prince and Windsor Castle Of the various fertilizers available, stable manure and super phosphate gave the best results but ploughed-in pea plants (green fertilizer) was also found to be beneficial.
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World War II
With the outbreak of the Second World War , Ron Lister of Parkdale enlisted with several friends in the Australian Army and saw service in the Middle East and Greece.
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Captain William Kenney was engaged in building the baths in Brighton Beach in 1872. The baths were in the news in 1855 when indecent conduct was reported to the police. Maintenance of this facility was an ongoing problem for which councils were reluctant to take responsibility. By the 1970s, the attendance at the baths had declined and they were finally demolished in 1979.
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The "Demise of Avenue of Honour at Cheltenham" concerns the lopping and lack of care of trees planted in recognition of many local young men who served in Australian military forces in World War One. The Cheltenham Progressive Association and the local Returned Soldiers’ Branch pressed the council to take action as they believed the condition of the trees reflected badly on the council and local residents. They requested eight specific improvements be made to the avenue of trees planted along Point Nepean Road.
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Joyce was a significant figure in this celebration which commenced in April 1959 and continued for over 40 years. She believed children should be encouraged to join a club where the idea of co-operation was instilled. “Dreams of youth”, she said, “should be made a reality and their energy harnessed for good outcomes.”
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This story traces the early history of the Cheltenham State Savings Bank and its incorporation into the Commonwealth Bank. There will be some Kingston residents who can remember the money boxes issued by the bank and taking ‘bank money’ to school on ‘Bank Day’ to have the amount recorded in their pink covered pass-book.
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The story, "Edwin Thomas Penny: Councillor, Orchardist and Pioneer", traces his life from his birth at Marylebone, London, to his arrival in Cheltenham and subsequent burial in the Pioneer Cemetery. Penny was a man strongly engaged in his local community, his shire council, his church and a host of local organisations.
World War II

Aboriginal Flag

City of Kingston acknowledges the Kulin Nation as the custodians of the land on which the municipality is a part and pays respect to their Elders, past and present. Council is a member of the Inter Council Aboriginal Consultative Committee (ICACC).